The Best-Kept Secret Spot in the Grand Canyon (Don’t Tell Them I Told You)

Shoshone Point

Enjoying a railing-free view at Shoshone Point

The Grand Canyon is a big place. Like, really big. In fact, it’s hard to describe just how big it is – almost as hard as describing just how amazing the view is. With all that space available, you’d think the last issue a visitor to this marvel of the natural world would encounter would be a crowd. But on the South Rim, especially near the visitor center, hordes of tourists from around the world can frequently be seen jostling for space at designated lookouts in search of the perfect canyon ‘selfie’.

The further you spread out from this epicenter of tourist activity, the more the crowds lessen. But if you’d like to have the entire canyon pretty much to yourself, allow me to share a little-known secret spot I discovered (after some ‘net research) that proved to be the highlight of my visit to one of the seven natural wonders of the world.

Shoshone Point

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Contemplate the solitude at Shoshone Point, Grand Canyon, USA

At the South Rim visitor center you can help yourself to a complimentary map – not that it will do you any good. Shoshone Point does not make an appearance. Right there, that tells you that they want this place to remain a secret – which is surprising considering that it is equipped with a picnic area and working restrooms. Apparently it’s meant for groups, but if you’re traveling as individuals there’s nothing to keep you from wandering over.

Getting There

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This is the only sign you’re in the right place

To get to Shoshone Point, it’s best to use your own private vehicle, though if you’re up for a long walk it’s not an impossibility. As you approach the visitor center, take a right on Desert View Drive. Not long afterwards you’ll pass a turnoff that’s only open to the free shuttle buses called Yaki Point Road. Just about a mile east of that is an unpaved parking area with no signage indicating where you are, located on the canyon side of the road. Pull in and get ready for a mild walk (approximately one mile) through pine forest to the lookout point. Alternately, you can take the bus to Yaki Point or the South Kaibab Trailhead (which is a great alternative and an excellent place to get down inside the canyon) then hoof it back down the road. Just a note: keep an eye out for wildlife. No sooner did I pull into the parking area when I came face to face with a coyote who decided my presence wasn’t his cup of tea and he skittered off.

When to Go

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View from Shoshone Point

Naturally, the heat in the middle of the day is less appealing to hike in, so for comfort as well as better lighting for photography, I recommend coming first thing in the morning, or for a great show, come around sunset. Just bear in mind that there are no railings and it is a long (long) way down, so watch your step in the waning light.

Can You Keep the Secret?

There’s no point in knowing a secret and not being able to tell it. I think this post embodies that. So feel free to share this secret spot after seeing it for yourself – that is if you have any words after witnessing that view – and you’ll still likely have the whole canyon to yourself. And if someone asks you where you heard about Shoshone Point…you didn’t hear it from me.

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Da Nang, Vietnam – Where Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad

Hoi An

Time to party in Hoi An, Vietnam

Sometimes in travel – as in life – it’s not always a question of this and that, but rather this or that. But as opposed to those unpleasant times when you have to choose between the lesser of two evils, there are times when you can see or do most of what you’d like, even if it isn’t everything. It may not be ideal, but as the song goes: Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad.

Not too long ago I was faced with one such situation. Our ship was docking in the Vietnamese city of Da Nang (technically Chan May), and from there we had a choice of visiting two of the three UNESCO World Heritage Sites within striking distance of a one-day tour: The ancient capital of Hue, the ancient ruins of My Son, and the former trading village of Hoi An. With limited time available, we opted for the latter two on a whirlwind tour that gave us a taste – though not a full mouthful – of all that’s on offer in central Vietnam. It wasn’t an ideal way of visiting this fascinating region, but as I said before, two out of three ain’t bad.

My Son

My Son

Let the past (and rain) wash over you at My Son, Vietnam

My Son (pronounced mee- sahn) is an ancient site of worship tucked well inland from the emerald waters of the coast. Though a good portion of the site was reduced to rubble courtesy of the U.S. Air Force, there are various temples, halls and other religious buildings that either escaped bombardment or are in the process of reconstruction.

At the entrance, you’ll need to take a stretch golf cart up the winding road to the visitor center proper. I wasn’t looking at the odometer but I figure it was at least a mile if not more. Given the fact that we were experiencing a full-on torrential downpour, the golf cart seemed the best option.

The cluster of ruins that awaited us looked like a scene right out of every adventure movie ever made. There were artifacts, strange writing carved in stone, and various figures represented – not to mention the most gigantic centipede I’ve ever seen scuttling through the undergrowth outside. Surrounding the complex is thick jungle, and on the day of my visit there rivers were swollen to capacity and at times our feet were underwater. So if it’s a rainy day, I recommend that you wear foot gear that you wouldn’t mind getting wet. Don’t let that discourage you though – sloshing through the jungles of Vietnam really fleshed out the experience.

Unless you really care about every temple and building, a few hours here will suffice. And if the weather is clear, it should be a photographer’s playground.

Hoi An

Hoi An Riverside

Follow the River in Hoi An World Heritage Site

The ancient trading post of Hoi An is a colorful amalgam of Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese culture and architecture. Once a major port for international trade, the town has been reborn as a tourist destination for its scenic riverfront and charming ambiance. In town you can busy yourself with a visit to the intricate Japanese Bridge or even more elaborate Chinese Temple. But most of all, take some time to wander the vibrant side streets which are filled with souvenir shops, a small museum and some of the most delicious Vietnamese food to be found anywhere. On the day of my visit, they were gearing up for a festival, so the streets and trees were decked out with colorful lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes. Not only did I leave wishing I could see what it looked like at night, but also wishing I had at least five to seven days to fully explore the town and all the activities around it.

Marble Mountains

Marble Mountains

Scene from the Marble Mountains, near Da Nang, Vietnam

The Marble Mountains are close to the coast and not far out of the city of Da Nang proper – which, incidentally, is a city undergoing rapid modernization. These five mountains rise almost vertically from the relatively level coastal plain, and host a number of temples that can be visited by those who have more time at their disposition. Below are numerous artisans that sculpt the marble into all sorts of beautiful figures, fountains and statues. If you’re on a guided tour, you can be certain that you’ll be making a stop to see ‘how things are made’ which is code for: tourist trap, please buy something. Despite the obvious commercialism, this would be the place to buy that giant marble elephant you’ve always wanted.

Final Thoughts

The most obvious observation of a day tour from Danang is that you really need more than a day tour to do the area justice. With the royal city of Hue not too far away, and one of the largest cave systems in the world within range, you can easily spend an exciting week of discovery in this Southeast Asian playground. So if you can do so, stay for awhile. If you’re on limited time like I was, content yourself with the wonders you’ve seen, and accept that in reality – you guessed it – two out of three ain’t bad.

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Good Morning Vietnam/Goodnight Saigon

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Streets of Saigon

When I was a boy, back before Desert Storm, Desert Shield and basically any other U.S. involvement with wars in the desert, the war most often depicted in movies and on television was the conflict in Vietnam. As a result, I grew up seeing and hearing more about a backwater country in Southeast Asia far more than an average Long Island kid ordinarily would. Among my favorite songs growing up was Billy Joel’s (another Long Island kid) haunting ballad Goodnight Saigon. Sure the references went right over my head, but it – along with other classic rock tributes – served to create a mystique in my young mind. Sadly, I’m not a young boy anymore, but it was still subconsciously satisfying to see this mainstay of 80’s pop culture references firsthand just last year.

Upon landing it felt like I was in a scene right out of the war, as throngs of Vietnamese swarmed the arrivals gate like it was the last chopper out of Saigon. I’d say that the scene was surreal, but with the million percent humidity I’d more accurately describe it as ‘sticky’.

Since my party was due to meet up with our cruise ship docked in nearby Phuy Muy, I thought I’d make the most out of the full day at our disposal in this, the largest and most congested of Vietnamese cities. So I booked us a city tour to catch the highlights and – more importantly – avoid navigating the choking traffic and general chaos on the city’s roads.

The War Remnants Museum

Though the war ended decades ago, its effects still reverberate today. Fortunately, today the social climate is far more welcoming toward visiting Americans, and even though the Vietnam conflict is not considered to be a chapter of great pride in American history, the majority of visitors to this tasteful museum were Yanks who slogged it halfway around the globe to see it firsthand.

Inside the building, there are displays showcasing a vast gamut of American military memorabilia such as uniforms, weapons, ordinance and personal effects. There are also photo galleries documenting the horrendous toll American bombing had on the local civilian populous. Due to the graphic nature of the images, those with a low trauma threshold might do well to skip this portion.

The conflict was presented from the point of view of the victors (isn’t it always?) and instead of gloating and portraying the atrocities in a way to foment rancor, it focused mainly on the idea of self-determination. Regardless of anyone’s personal views on the causes and issues the war was fought over, no one can leave without shaking their heads at the senseless carnage wreaked mostly upon innocent civilians.

For those interested in more serious ‘hardware’, surrounding the grounds are various tanks, aircraft and other military vehicles that were left behind, which can make for some interesting photographic backdrops.

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War Remnants Museum

Other Buildings of Interest

Saigon (technically Ho Chi Mihn City) isn’t exactly dripping with famous monuments, but on a city tour you’ll likely be brought in front of the Reunification Palace for a photo op and to the Central Post Office. It is here at the latter that you’ll see a strong example of French architecture, hinting to its past under French colonial rule. It’s not exactly a not-to-miss destination, but is an interesting place to stretch your legs and take in the atmosphere. You can also buy a few sticky doughnuts from vendors carrying them around in a giant conical heap atop their heads, if only to just say that you did (they’re tasty without being too sweet).

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Reunification Palace, Saigon

Lunch: Your Highlight…Trust Me

Included in our tour was lunch in a literal back-alley restaurant called Cyclo Resto. Here we were able to sample some fantastic Vietnamese cuisine family style, including some delicious Vietnamese egg coffee. While the landscape and culture in Vietnam is both fascinating and appealing, I think you’ll agree with me that the food is what launches a visit here to the top of a traveler’s list.

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Try some amazing egg coffee

A Farewell

After some extremely sticky shopping in the close quarters of a tourist flea market, it was time to make our way out of the city and out in to the Mekong Delta to catch our ship. While Vietnam is an amazing tourist destination, I can honestly say that Saigon does not belong on a list of top sights. But if you have a day to kill and want to see a city that has been immortalized in both film and song, take the time to say “Good morning Vietnam” and the inevitable “Goodnight, Saigon”.

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Rafting with the Wild Man of Borneo

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The Rafting Party, Borneo, Malaysia

Often, the term “Wild Man of Borneo” is in reference to the orangutan, which is native to the island of Borneo and whose human-like mannerisms and intelligence beg for such a comparison. In my own context, that term has an entirely different meaning, referring instead to a reckless whitewater rafting guide whose antics potentially jeopardized an otherwise fascinating visit to this amazing island. But before divulging that particular story, let me share a few important details.

Where is Borneo and how do you get there?

The island of Borneo is located approximately midway between Southeast Asia and the Australian continent, and just slightly southwest of the Philippine archipelago. The island is shared by three countries: Malaysia, Indonesia, and the small nation of Brunei. Most tourists arrive via the coastal city of Kota Kinabalu, situated in the northern reaches of Malaysia’s Bornean real estate. Kota Kinabula – often shortened to just ‘KK’ is serviced by many Asian airlines, though to my knowledge there are no direct flights from either Europe or North America. Alternately, it is a port of call for various cruise itineraries – including my own which brought me to this primordial tropical paradise for just one day of exploration.

What is Borneo like?

Borneo is likely just as wild and exotic as you’ve heard it rumored to be. It is a rugged natural wonderland of ancient jungles and intriguing rock formations, as well as home to the tallest peak in Southeast Asia – Mount Kinabalu, where you can escape the steamy tropical weather via altitude. The city of KK has all the modern conveniences that have blurred the lines of culture, yet just outside the city you can find lovely islands  with turquoise beaches, trek into the jungle to watch the comically-endowed proboscis monkey or seek the humongous (and smelly) Rafflesia bloom – the world’s largest flower. You can also sample exciting whitewater rafting through ancient stands of rain forest, which was the option I chose for my limited sojourn, and which brought me face to face with my own version of the “Wild Man of Borneo”.

What can be expected on a whitewater rafting trip in Borneo?

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Rafting the Kiulu River, Borneo, Malaysia

I had arranged a whitewater rafting tour ahead of time with a reputable operator, who arranged for my party to be picked up at the port (though there was confusion as to where, but that’s another story) and taken about forty-five minutes into the foothills of Mount Kinabalu, clad in rugged swathes of thick rain forest only lightly bearing witness to the presence of man. We were brought to a secondary starting point due to high water levels during that time, at a tiny village on the Kiulu River, which is ominously pronounced similar to the Kill-You River. More on that in a second.

It was at this point that we met our guide, who told us his name was ‘Dude’. Unless his mother was a pot-smoking skateboarder totally taken aback by the act of giving birth to him, I’m inclined to believe that this was a self-appointed moniker. Along with his assistant – a Mr. Kudu (again likely a pseudonym) – we were given equipment and instructions on paddling, emergency procedures, and what to do if you fall out of the boat. Little did I know then that this was more of a preview than a preventative lesson.

We set out into the greenish-brown waters under an overcast sky. The river was rather wide, but the aforementioned water levels meant that it was moving swiftly – a good thing for those not looking to paddle the whole time. Inevitably, with bends in the river, there were moderate rapids, which were fun and sufficiently exciting for most. Apparently Dude and Mr. Kudu didn’t find them stimulating enough, and while the rest of us paddled furiously to avoid crashing the raft into the hefty boulders lining the riverbanks, they guided us with expert skill right into them, time and again.

I was the first one to fall out of the raft when we slipped vertically up the side of a boulder. I spun to face downriver as instructed but still wound up being pummeled by a few submerged rocks. On the next bend, while enjoying the rapids, we again found ourselves inexplicably up against the boulders, where this time it was my mother who was dumped into the frothing water. Fortunately she (and the rest of us) escaped serious injury, but it soon became clear that despite his enthusiastic shouts of where and how hard we should paddle, Dude was steering us right into the spots that would make the trip more ‘interesting’.

Now, let me just say that I am fully aware that rafting has an inherent level of risk, and if it weren’t exciting, no one would want to do it. However, it really annoyed me that we were being subjected to unnecessary risks, ones that would not only would jeopardize the rest of our vacation, but our health as well. So it was at this point, after rowing furiously away from the rocks and looking back at our guides doing just the opposite, that I shouted in no uncertain terms that we didn’t want to crash anymore, and would they please refrain from doing so. Considering that for the rest of the trip we managed to navigate the swirling vortexes of turbulence without any further upsets, this only served to prove that my earlier suspicions were correct.

With the threat of imminent death or dismemberment removed, we were able to more fully enjoy the panoramas that unfolded around every turn; the massive tree limbs being strangled by hefty creepers that overhung the riverbanks; the occasional waterfalls trickling out of the jungle to add to the swollen river; the rickety rope bridges that connect one unseen village with another. At one particularly calm stretch , I was allowed to hop into the river and drift along freestyle, to serenely take in the scenery. And when we eventually arrived at our take-out point, the deafening chorus of insects and pungent smell of the wet jungle left me desperately wishing I had more time to spend in this primeval paradise – with or without a suicidal guide.

Would you recommend such a trip for a first-time visitor?

Yes, I absolutely would, though I would first explain a few caveats:

While you wouldn’t need to be in superb shape (such as would be required for those looking to summit Mount Kinabalu), there is a level of physical exertion inherent in the sport of whitewater rafting, and rafting Borneo is no exception. Be ready to paddle, either for your life or just to move forward more quickly.

If you’re afraid of nature, water, potential danger and/or being out in the sun, then perhaps this activity is not for you. But if you wear waterproof sunscreen, brace yourself for the possibility of a few bumps and bruises and embrace your inner sense of adventure, you’ll not only be just fine, but will have a great bucket-list item to casually boast about back home (“that reminds me of that time I was whitewater rafting back in Borneo…”).

How would you sum up a visit to Borneo?

I would say that a trip to Borneo is likely to be the highlight of one’s travels – provided said traveler has an appreciation for nature in the raw and at least a moderate sense of adventure. Just saying the name Borneo conjures images of untouched jungles and exotic flora and fauna. Visitors who venture into the interior will find all of that and more. I highly recommend putting Borneo on your list of future destinations, and even more highly recommend spending at least a week or more exploring the plethora of natural and soft-adventure options that the island offers.

And in the event that you do come, and run into my friend Dude, for your own sake, just tell him that you’ll be taking your next tour without him.

 

 

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