Posts Tagged With: Vietnam

Trip Accomplice 2017 Year In Review

Shoshone Point

Enjoying a railing-free view at Shoshone Point

Well, it’s January again, which means it’s time to take a quick look in the rear view mirror before moving on to the year ahead. Below is a recap of the articles that have appeared here on the Trip Accomplice blog – I invite you to take a look in case there was something you missed. I’ll even refrain from mocking you for it.

The Facts

This year I’ve led my readers on a tour through destinations in 7 foreign countries and 2 famous spots in the U.S.A. Along the way I’ve recounted some amazing experiences available at said destinations, as well as practical advice, points of interest, and even a few tips.

Destinations Abroad

The subjects of my posts this past year were overwhelmingly slanted toward Asia-to the tune of seven out of seven. Considering that most of the world’s population and landmass resides there, this should come as no surprise. Add to that the fact that my past two journeys abroad were a whirlwind tour of Southeast Asia and a few weeks in Sri Lanka via a stop in the Middle East, and the implications are clear.


Me and the Manta, Nusa Penida

The first post was on the amazing opportunity visitors to Bali are afforded in: Mantas Need Showers Too-Diving Nusa Penida. If you ever wanted to float among giants, then this post is worth checking out. Even if you don’t have the guts, but are curious to see a maniac like myself doing so, it’s still worth a look. Next I focused my attention to the next archipelago over in Touring Manila Without Pushing The Envelope – an overview of what to do and see in the Philippine capital. Spoiler Alert: there isn’t much, but if you happen to be there, I’ve got some suggestions for you.

Hoi An

Time to party in Hoi An, Vietnam

The next stop on our Asian tour focused on another awesome experience, this time outside of the city of Kota Kinabalu in Malaysian Borneo. As the title would suggest Rafting with the Wild Man of Borneo, this is a destination piece that not only details the perils of whitewater rafting in the primordial rain forests of Borneo, but the incredible nature of the setting. Even if you’ve never picked up a paddle (or ever intend to) it’s still a fun read. From there I crossed the South China Sea for two posts about the underrated destination of Vietnam. In Good Morning Vietnam/Goodnight Saigon I recounted the sights to see in Vietnam’s most vibrant city through the lens of an American who grew up in an era where that was the war featured in pop culture’s attention. Next I shared some practical details about two out of three of the top sights of Central Vietnam in Da Nang, Vietnam – Where Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad. For the record, this area could have easily occupied several weeks of activity, instead of the single day I had at my disposal. If you’re looking for some tropical/historic vacation ideas, you’ll definitely want to take a peek at what you missed.


View from the top at Sigiriya, Sri Lanka

Shifting to Central Asia, I posted my longest piece of the year-a rundown of not only the best destinations to see in Sri Lanka, but everything a potential traveler would need to know before going in the post India Lite: An Overview of Sri Lanka. The nearly three weeks I spent there in June/July of 2017 gave me a great view of both the highlights and the challenges. If I had to sum it up in a few words: the good outweighed the bad. The next post touched on a little jitney I took on my way there, entitled Day Trip to Musandam, Oman. Since I had over 24 hours to spend in Dubai, UAE, naturally I had to venture further afield. This post tells you the practicalities and pros and cons of doing so.


Take a stroll on the aerial walkway for a scene out of Myst

Lastly, I once again wrote about Southeast Asia in Singapore’s Gardens by the Bay – Where Myst Meets Pandora, which tells about the biggest difference in the city/state since the last time I had visited in 2003. Filled with references from my younger years, it’s a good place to start for anyone considering a trip to Singapore.

Destinations At Home


Stop and smell the flowers in Aquinnah

2017 saw me visiting two famous American destinations – one for the first time, the other for the first time as an adult.

In The Best-Kept Secret Spot in the Grand Canyon (Don’t Tell Them I Told You) I shared specific details on finding this special place away from the crowds in arguably the most majestic site of natural beauty anywhere. Not only is the Grand Canyon an absolute must for any serious traveler, but the “secret spot” is a must for those who wish to enjoy it in relative privacy.

The other popular U.S. destination I featured was in the post A Day in the Vineyard (Wine Optional), which was a rundown of the sights and logistics of visiting the New England gem of Martha’s Vineyard. Though not terribly different geologically than my birthplace of Long Island, this staple of summer fun was everything I’d hoped it would be and more.

What’s Next in 2018?

The only concrete travel plans I have in 2018 are on a Western Caribbean cruise beginning in February which will take me back to three places I have visited previously – Mexico, Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. The last time I visited the former and the latter was over 17 years ago, so I’m sure I’ll have some updated information to share. Besides that I have some ideas in the works, but won’t speculate too much until they firm up.

Speaking of what’s next, if you, dear reader have a destination you’d like me to speak about, or speak more about, please leave a comment below and perhaps you just might get your wish before the 2018 Year in Review. And as always, thanks for being a loyal reader and accompanying me around the world. It wouldn’t be the same trip without you.

Categories: Destinations, Miscellaneous | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Da Nang, Vietnam – Where Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad

Hoi An

Time to party in Hoi An, Vietnam

Sometimes in travel – as in life – it’s not always a question of this and that, but rather this or that. But as opposed to those unpleasant times when you have to choose between the lesser of two evils, there are times when you can see or do most of what you’d like, even if it isn’t everything. It may not be ideal, but as the song goes: Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad.

Not too long ago I was faced with one such situation. Our ship was docking in the Vietnamese city of Da Nang (technically Chan May), and from there we had a choice of visiting two of the three UNESCO World Heritage Sites within striking distance of a one-day tour: The ancient capital of Hue, the ancient ruins of My Son, and the former trading village of Hoi An. With limited time available, we opted for the latter two on a whirlwind tour that gave us a taste – though not a full mouthful – of all that’s on offer in central Vietnam. It wasn’t an ideal way of visiting this fascinating region, but as I said before, two out of three ain’t bad.

My Son

My Son

Let the past (and rain) wash over you at My Son, Vietnam

My Son (pronounced mee- sahn) is an ancient site of worship tucked well inland from the emerald waters of the coast. Though a good portion of the site was reduced to rubble courtesy of the U.S. Air Force, there are various temples, halls and other religious buildings that either escaped bombardment or are in the process of reconstruction.

At the entrance, you’ll need to take a stretch golf cart up the winding road to the visitor center proper. I wasn’t looking at the odometer but I figure it was at least a mile if not more. Given the fact that we were experiencing a full-on torrential downpour, the golf cart seemed the best option.

The cluster of ruins that awaited us looked like a scene right out of every adventure movie ever made. There were artifacts, strange writing carved in stone, and various figures represented – not to mention the most gigantic centipede I’ve ever seen scuttling through the undergrowth outside. Surrounding the complex is thick jungle, and on the day of my visit there rivers were swollen to capacity and at times our feet were underwater. So if it’s a rainy day, I recommend that you wear foot gear that you wouldn’t mind getting wet. Don’t let that discourage you though – sloshing through the jungles of Vietnam really fleshed out the experience.

Unless you really care about every temple and building, a few hours here will suffice. And if the weather is clear, it should be a photographer’s playground.

Hoi An

Hoi An Riverside

Follow the River in Hoi An World Heritage Site

The ancient trading post of Hoi An is a colorful amalgam of Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese culture and architecture. Once a major port for international trade, the town has been reborn as a tourist destination for its scenic riverfront and charming ambiance. In town you can busy yourself with a visit to the intricate Japanese Bridge or even more elaborate Chinese Temple. But most of all, take some time to wander the vibrant side streets which are filled with souvenir shops, a small museum and some of the most delicious Vietnamese food to be found anywhere. On the day of my visit, they were gearing up for a festival, so the streets and trees were decked out with colorful lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes. Not only did I leave wishing I could see what it looked like at night, but also wishing I had at least five to seven days to fully explore the town and all the activities around it.

Marble Mountains

Marble Mountains

Scene from the Marble Mountains, near Da Nang, Vietnam

The Marble Mountains are close to the coast and not far out of the city of Da Nang proper – which, incidentally, is a city undergoing rapid modernization. These five mountains rise almost vertically from the relatively level coastal plain, and host a number of temples that can be visited by those who have more time at their disposition. Below are numerous artisans that sculpt the marble into all sorts of beautiful figures, fountains and statues. If you’re on a guided tour, you can be certain that you’ll be making a stop to see ‘how things are made’ which is code for: tourist trap, please buy something. Despite the obvious commercialism, this would be the place to buy that giant marble elephant you’ve always wanted.

Final Thoughts

The most obvious observation of a day tour from Danang is that you really need more than a day tour to do the area justice. With the royal city of Hue not too far away, and one of the largest cave systems in the world within range, you can easily spend an exciting week of discovery in this Southeast Asian playground. So if you can do so, stay for awhile. If you’re on limited time like I was, content yourself with the wonders you’ve seen, and accept that in reality – you guessed it – two out of three ain’t bad.

Categories: Destinations | Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

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