Monthly Archives: May 2017

Da Nang, Vietnam – Where Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad

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Time to party in Hoi An, Vietnam

Sometimes in travel – as in life – it’s not always a question of this and that, but rather this or that. But as opposed to those unpleasant times when you have to choose between the lesser of two evils, there are times when you can see or do most of what you’d like, even if it isn’t everything. It may not be ideal, but as the song goes: Two Out of Three Ain’t Bad.

Not too long ago I was faced with one such situation. Our ship was docking in the Vietnamese city of Da Nang (technically Chan May), and from there we had a choice of visiting two of the three UNESCO World Heritage Sites within striking distance of a one-day tour: The ancient capital of Hue, the ancient ruins of My Son, and the former trading village of Hoi An. With limited time available, we opted for the latter two on a whirlwind tour that gave us a taste – though not a full mouthful – of all that’s on offer in central Vietnam. It wasn’t an ideal way of visiting this fascinating region, but as I said before, two out of three ain’t bad.

My Son

My Son

Let the past (and rain) wash over you at My Son, Vietnam

My Son (pronounced mee- sahn) is an ancient site of worship tucked well inland from the emerald waters of the coast. Though a good portion of the site was reduced to rubble courtesy of the U.S. Air Force, there are various temples, halls and other religious buildings that either escaped bombardment or are in the process of reconstruction.

At the entrance, you’ll need to take a stretch golf cart up the winding road to the visitor center proper. I wasn’t looking at the odometer but I figure it was at least a mile if not more. Given the fact that we were experiencing a full-on torrential downpour, the golf cart seemed the best option.

The cluster of ruins that awaited us looked like a scene right out of every adventure movie ever made. There were artifacts, strange writing carved in stone, and various figures represented – not to mention the most gigantic centipede I’ve ever seen scuttling through the undergrowth outside. Surrounding the complex is thick jungle, and on the day of my visit there rivers were swollen to capacity and at times our feet were underwater. So if it’s a rainy day, I recommend that you wear foot gear that you wouldn’t mind getting wet. Don’t let that discourage you though – sloshing through the jungles of Vietnam really fleshed out the experience.

Unless you really care about every temple and building, a few hours here will suffice. And if the weather is clear, it should be a photographer’s playground.

Hoi An

Hoi An Riverside

Follow the River in Hoi An World Heritage Site

The ancient trading post of Hoi An is a colorful amalgam of Chinese, Japanese and Vietnamese culture and architecture. Once a major port for international trade, the town has been reborn as a tourist destination for its scenic riverfront and charming ambiance. In town you can busy yourself with a visit to the intricate Japanese Bridge or even more elaborate Chinese Temple. But most of all, take some time to wander the vibrant side streets which are filled with souvenir shops, a small museum and some of the most delicious Vietnamese food to be found anywhere. On the day of my visit, they were gearing up for a festival, so the streets and trees were decked out with colorful lanterns of all colors, shapes and sizes. Not only did I leave wishing I could see what it looked like at night, but also wishing I had at least five to seven days to fully explore the town and all the activities around it.

Marble Mountains

Marble Mountains

Scene from the Marble Mountains, near Da Nang, Vietnam

The Marble Mountains are close to the coast and not far out of the city of Da Nang proper – which, incidentally, is a city undergoing rapid modernization. These five mountains rise almost vertically from the relatively level coastal plain, and host a number of temples that can be visited by those who have more time at their disposition. Below are numerous artisans that sculpt the marble into all sorts of beautiful figures, fountains and statues. If you’re on a guided tour, you can be certain that you’ll be making a stop to see ‘how things are made’ which is code for: tourist trap, please buy something. Despite the obvious commercialism, this would be the place to buy that giant marble elephant you’ve always wanted.

Final Thoughts

The most obvious observation of a day tour from Danang is that you really need more than a day tour to do the area justice. With the royal city of Hue not too far away, and one of the largest cave systems in the world within range, you can easily spend an exciting week of discovery in this Southeast Asian playground. So if you can do so, stay for awhile. If you’re on limited time like I was, content yourself with the wonders you’ve seen, and accept that in reality – you guessed it – two out of three ain’t bad.

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Good Morning Vietnam/Goodnight Saigon

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Streets of Saigon

When I was a boy, back before Desert Storm, Desert Shield and basically any other U.S. involvement with wars in the desert, the war most often depicted in movies and on television was the conflict in Vietnam. As a result, I grew up seeing and hearing more about a backwater country in Southeast Asia far more than an average Long Island kid ordinarily would. Among my favorite songs growing up was Billy Joel’s (another Long Island kid) haunting ballad Goodnight Saigon. Sure the references went right over my head, but it – along with other classic rock tributes – served to create a mystique in my young mind. Sadly, I’m not a young boy anymore, but it was still subconsciously satisfying to see this mainstay of 80’s pop culture references firsthand just last year.

Upon landing it felt like I was in a scene right out of the war, as throngs of Vietnamese swarmed the arrivals gate like it was the last chopper out of Saigon. I’d say that the scene was surreal, but with the million percent humidity I’d more accurately describe it as ‘sticky’.

Since my party was due to meet up with our cruise ship docked in nearby Phuy Muy, I thought I’d make the most out of the full day at our disposal in this, the largest and most congested of Vietnamese cities. So I booked us a city tour to catch the highlights and – more importantly – avoid navigating the choking traffic and general chaos on the city’s roads.

The War Remnants Museum

Though the war ended decades ago, its effects still reverberate today. Fortunately, today the social climate is far more welcoming toward visiting Americans, and even though the Vietnam conflict is not considered to be a chapter of great pride in American history, the majority of visitors to this tasteful museum were Yanks who slogged it halfway around the globe to see it firsthand.

Inside the building, there are displays showcasing a vast gamut of American military memorabilia such as uniforms, weapons, ordinance and personal effects. There are also photo galleries documenting the horrendous toll American bombing had on the local civilian populous. Due to the graphic nature of the images, those with a low trauma threshold might do well to skip this portion.

The conflict was presented from the point of view of the victors (isn’t it always?) and instead of gloating and portraying the atrocities in a way to foment rancor, it focused mainly on the idea of self-determination. Regardless of anyone’s personal views on the causes and issues the war was fought over, no one can leave without shaking their heads at the senseless carnage wreaked mostly upon innocent civilians.

For those interested in more serious ‘hardware’, surrounding the grounds are various tanks, aircraft and other military vehicles that were left behind, which can make for some interesting photographic backdrops.

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War Remnants Museum

Other Buildings of Interest

Saigon (technically Ho Chi Mihn City) isn’t exactly dripping with famous monuments, but on a city tour you’ll likely be brought in front of the Reunification Palace for a photo op and to the Central Post Office. It is here at the latter that you’ll see a strong example of French architecture, hinting to its past under French colonial rule. It’s not exactly a not-to-miss destination, but is an interesting place to stretch your legs and take in the atmosphere. You can also buy a few sticky doughnuts from vendors carrying them around in a giant conical heap atop their heads, if only to just say that you did (they’re tasty without being too sweet).

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Reunification Palace, Saigon

Lunch: Your Highlight…Trust Me

Included in our tour was lunch in a literal back-alley restaurant called Cyclo Resto. Here we were able to sample some fantastic Vietnamese cuisine family style, including some delicious Vietnamese egg coffee. While the landscape and culture in Vietnam is both fascinating and appealing, I think you’ll agree with me that the food is what launches a visit here to the top of a traveler’s list.

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Try some amazing egg coffee

A Farewell

After some extremely sticky shopping in the close quarters of a tourist flea market, it was time to make our way out of the city and out in to the Mekong Delta to catch our ship. While Vietnam is an amazing tourist destination, I can honestly say that Saigon does not belong on a list of top sights. But if you have a day to kill and want to see a city that has been immortalized in both film and song, take the time to say “Good morning Vietnam” and the inevitable “Goodnight, Saigon”.

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