Bryggen of Bergen – Character & Charm That is Way Off the Level

Bryggen of Bergen, Norway

Bryggen of Bergen, Norway

The Norwegian city of Bergen, tucked into the hilly archipelago of Norway’s west coast, is a lot of things. It is charming. It is historic. It is picturesque. And when speaking about its main attraction – Bryggen – it is all these things, except level.

This colorful wharf in heart of the Bergen’s inner harbor is a combination window-to-the-past and current tourist destination. Originally a functioning German commercial base established by the Hanseatic League in the late Middle Ages, these rows of leaning wooden buildings in a palette of bright colors are now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. They are also among the most recognizable buildings in Norway. Nowadays, they host more tourists than merchants, but when the cruise ships pull out and the locals emerge, it’s also a cool place to explore, shop and even grab a bite to eat.

The Back-story

Back alley of Bryggen

Back alley of Bryggen

For those not up on their Germanic history, the Hanseatic League was a collection of merchant guilds and their associated market ports in northern Europe. Bergen was one such port established in the mid-1300’s, and since then the iconic row of houses and buildings known as Bryggen has burnt down and been rebuilt several times. With all-wood construction, I suppose that’s the risk you take. In view of the tilted, off-kilter nature of these buildings (some over 300 years old), I’m assuming their builders didn’t have access to a working level. The result is a charming warren of shops and restaurants, with quaint alleys and even quainter views. Picture in your mind Popeye’s Sweethaven dubbed in Norwegian, and you’ll have the general idea.

How to Get There

Bergen is nestled along a bend in Norway’s highly-irregular coastline, which honestly looks as if it were drawn by a seismometer during an earthquake. Many arrive by sea on one of the many cruise lines that include Bergen as a port of call before delving into the fjords. You can arrive by car, which will afford you some stunning views both on your approach and your departure. Or you can join the masses in a Norway in a Nutshell tour, which will take you via train between Oslo and Bergen, usually with a stop in Myrdal (and nearby Flåm) for some scenery. However you get here, finding the Bryggen is easy. Find the waterfront, and when you see a bunch of crooked wooden buildings lined up in a wobbly row of eye-catching colors, you’re there.

What to See

Bryggen at dusk

Bryggen at dusk

Beyond the Bryggen and its photo opportunities, the stone fortress called Bergenhus is a well-preserved castle at the entrance to the harbor. Some areas are accessible by paid admission only, but there are sections you can explore for free. At the edge of the harbor just down the street from Bryggen is the Fish Market, which sells, um, fish. Lots of fish. More fish than a visiting tourist would ever need. If you’re not into collecting seafood, many vendors set up souvenir stalls during the day just across the square.

 

Details (on the level)

In summer, expect Bryggen and surrounding tourist attractions to be filled with visitors. If you can wait for later on when the cruise ships cast off, you can mill about with the locals, who in summertime are out in force well into the night. Lodging is rather expensive (as are most things in Norway) and parking can be a real issue. Most of the city is walkable, so unless you’re arriving by car or just renting one for the day, a vehicle is neither necessary nor recommended. English is widely spoken, so if you get lost, most people can help you out. Most of all, while the city is a great place to see, make sure you spend the bulk of your time visiting Norway’s natural attractions, which are, to put it mildly, mind-blowing.

Bryggen in daylight

Bryggen in daylight

Yes, I recommend Bergen’s Bryggen to anyone planning a visit to the city. I was originally going to skip Bergen on my own itinerary, but in hindsight am very glad that I didn’t. So far, no World Heritage Site I’ve visited has ever disappointed, and Bryggen was no exception. Make room for it if you can in your travels to western Norway. Count on character. Count on charm. Count on that subtle thrill of being surrounded by authentic history. The only thing you shouldn’t count on, is encountering right angles.


Have you visited Bergen? What did you enjoy most? Comment here and share your expertise!

Advertisements
Categories: Destinations | Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

Post navigation

6 thoughts on “Bryggen of Bergen – Character & Charm That is Way Off the Level

  1. I have not visited Norway yet. Almost did in two opportunities but it was winter so felt it could be too cold. Next time maybe! It is one of the European countries in my “I want to go” list

    Like

    • I don’t blame you for holding off. Some of the most amazingly scenic routes are closed in the winter. Wait till you can do it right

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ve always heard this is the place to visit when visiting Norway. Rick Steves did a good piece on it on his radio show that made it sound great. Your photos are lovely.

    Like

    • Thanks so much for the compliment, though in all fairness it’s the kind of place you could drop your camera and still get off a decent shot

      Like

  3. Pingback: Take A Ride on the Flåmsbana. Do Not Pass Go. Do Not Collect $200 | Trip Accomplice

  4. Pingback: 2015 Trip Accomplice Year in Review | Trip Accomplice

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: